Ride the Tiger, Smack the Pony, Slap the Nazis.

Posted by on Apr 14, 2013 | 0 comments

Ride the Tiger, Smack the Pony, Slap the Nazis.

 

When studying and researching Traditionalism and Traditionalist authors, it is quite rare to really capture the essence of what the thinkers in question were like in their everyday life. Did Reghini laugh heartily when reading Futurist funnies on the papers? Did Guénon enjoy the odd drink with his mates, before moving to Cairo and converting to Islam? To these questions, there is no definitive answer. What we do know, thanks to a document of the Ministero della Cultura Popolare of 1942 recently published by Arthos magazine (thanks to Nicola Crea for the permission to reproduce the document itself), is that Julius Evola enjoyed spending time on the beautiful island of Capri; and that, although he kept the SS in the highest of esteem, and after reading the works of Johan Jacob Bachofen (1815-1887) had come to appreciate the fiery male Aryan spirit of the Germans to what he had at one point described as the Tellurian matriarchal Italian way of life, he still defended the honour of the land which had given him fame and fortune.

.. how to slap Nazis.

.. how to slap Nazis.

Here follows the translation of the document, in which Evola defends the honour of the Italian military, German soldiers learn not to mess with monocled Traditionalists and plots of subversive Ally involvement are thrown in, to enrich the drama. Sometimes, just sometimes, researching Traditionalism does make a researcher smile with satisfaction.

 

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In the past days, in a restaurant in Capri, an incident occurred, involving the author Giulio Evola and a group of German soldiers, who, expressing their opinions on the war, and in particular on the Italian participation, declared that ‘it would have been better to ‘lump’ Italy with all the other Nations occupied by Germany, since Mussolini was not up to standard; that passing through the Brennero [pass] would have been a game, since Italians are cowards’.

At this point Evola slapped one of the German soldiers, who had more openly spoken his mind. The incident was interrupted thanks to the intervention of the owner and of a Carabinieri NCO officer, who referred what had happened to his superiors.

Attention is brought to this: the soldiers, on holiday in Capri, of whom we have talked about, came straight from Germany. This proves that without even knowing Italy and the Italian soldier, German military comes to us with preconceived ideas, as if they obeyed to suggestions, timely implanted, from common enemies, to weaken the Axis.

And since the case signalled was not the first of its kind, the report of the incident caused by Evola does not aim to sanction singles; but to a possible action by the German hierarchy, in order to prevent the diffusion of ideas which fall in contrast with those officially dispatched and pernicious to a real solidarity between the two Peoples

27 January XX

DR. KRIEG.mlm

View from Villa Giove, Capri, 1942.

View from Villa Giove, Capri, 1942.

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